Cambridge IGCSE Information and Communication Technology (ICT) concentrates on the principles of information presentation and processing so that, although students will study contemporary hardware, software and applications as examples, they should be well equipped to appreciate future developments in the technology and its applications. It also explores computer systems design, and networking and internet technologies.

In addition to the theoretical content, students develop their practical skills in website design, office applications and using and creating databases.

Aims

The aims are to help learners to:

  • Understand and use applications.
  • Use Information and Communication Technology (ICT) to solve problems.
  • Analyse, design, implement, test and evaluate ICT systems, ensuring that they are fit for purpose.
  • Understand the implications of technology in society, including social, economic and ethical uses.
  • Develop an awareness of the ways ICT can help in home, learning and work environments.

Syllabus content

The syllabus can be broken down into six content areas:

  1. Computer components and operations
  2. Networking, the internet, safety and security
  3. The systems lifecycle (analysis, design, creation and documentation)
  4. Audiences, the law and ethics
  5. Word processing, spreadsheets, presentations and databases
  6. Image manipulation and website authoring

Double award

Most IGCSE subjects studied include two lessons each week and result in a single qualification. This option gives students the opportunity to gain both IGCSE Computer Science and IGCSE Information and Communication Technology (ICT) from three lessons a week.

As Computer Science focuses on how computers work and ICT looks at how we use computers, a strong understanding of each subject helps improve the student’s understanding of the other.

Split of content areas between the two subjects

Most of the content areas in the syllabuses for the two subjects are common between the two subjects, but one subject merely introduces it while the other subject covers it in depth. This helps students to better understand content that might only be superficially covered in the single subjects.

These broad content areas are introduced in one subject and covered in depth in the other:

  • Hardware, software and computer systems (in depth in Computer Science, introduced in ICT)
  • The internet, networking and ethics (in depth in ICT, introduced in Computer Science)

The two subjects diverge on the following focused content areas:

  • Problem-solving and Programming (Computer Science only)
  • Data representation (binary, encoding and cryptography) (Computer Science only)
  • Word processing, spreadsheets, presentations and databases (ICT only)
  • Image manipulation and website authoring (ICT only)
  • The systems lifecycle (analysis, design, creation and documentation) (ICT only)

In Year 10, content will be clearly identified as to which subject (or subjects) it belongs but the three lessons will not be split for the specific subjects. In Year 11, our students study the practical sides of these subjects with one lesson being specifically for Computer Science and two lessons for ICT. This will allow students the opportunity to continue with both programmes of study or to drop either Computer Science or ICT in Year 11 to focus on the other, or to use the time to catch up with other IGCSE subjects.

Assessment

Paper title Duration and marks What’s in the paper? Percentage of final grade
Paper 1:
Theory
2 hours
(100 Marks)
Questions will be based on all sections of the subject content. 40%
Paper 2:
Document Production, Data Manipulation and Presentations
2 hours 30 minutes
(80 Marks)
This is a practical examination using the PCs.
This test assesses the practical skills needed to use the applications covered in sections 17, 18 and 19 of the subject content.
Candidates must demonstrate the practical skills relevant to sections 11โ€“16.
30%
Paper 3:
Data Analysis and Website Authoring
2 hours 30 minutes
(80 Marks)
This is a practical examination using the PCs.
This test assesses the practical skills needed to use the applications covered in sections 20 and 21 of the subject content.
Candidates must demonstrate the practical skills relevant to sections 11โ€“16.
30%

Find out more

You can find out more by visiting the qualification page on the Cambridge Assessment website.